Technology

AdBlock can no longer block YouTube Ads

YouTube advertisements conveniently bypass the well-known AdBlock extension on Chrome to display three-minute long unstoppable pre-videos.

Google is controlling us, and has been doing since its surge. We are always surrounded by gadgets and tech, constantly fiddling with them – starting with a wake up call to the last email sent out in the midnight. What’s so fascinating is that more than half the interaction with these non-livings is done with the help of Google, in a way.

Your phone, Android. Your browser is probably a product of Google. Your email client, music service, maps, content and many more. You can’t budge from either of these services and the tech giant knows it. Knowingly or unknowingly, the firm has managed to bring in a jab at consumer’s choice with its new YouTube Adblock policies in Chrome browser.

Owing to the diminishing profits at YouTube, the management might have found a way around to weave money out of ads. And so comes the mischievous covenant with AdBlock.

A 3 min ad? Really? I have adblock also how is this even possible? pic.twitter.com/3BmqZAGzIr — revVGC (@r4rev2) September 7, 2015

The hysterically weird part is, only the users with Adblock ‘enabled’ are punished with longer 3-minute videos. The only way left for them is to either pause Adblock, or to white-list YouTube. Sorry AdBlocker Plus users, you are effected too.

Cleverly, YouTube now treats advertisements as pre-videos on the site, and only the ‘Skip Ad’ button is traced as an advertisement by AdBlock.

However, few enthusiasts claim to have found a way to bypass Google’s bypass, like how @SteeScribbles suggests here:

Fixed it. It seems to be just a Chrome thing. According to Adblock, uninstalling the “YouTube” “app” resolves the issue. — SteeScribbles (@SteeScribbles) September 6, 2015

You might have not seen this coming but this is a helluva update, obviously a blow to the free internet. You can’t really blame either of the parties here because one’s activity is injurious to the other. It does bring some justice to content creates, advertisers and the service provider but at the same time scraps the damn out of user experience.